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5 Reasons Why HD DVD Owners Should Go Blu

Posted by Mehar Gill on January 5, 2009 
Filed Under: Blu-ray, Downloads, Format War, HD DVD



With just a few days to go before the one year anniversary of Warner’s shocking decision, we figure it would be a good time to highlight why those still holding onto HD DVD should considering introducing Blu into their day to day lives.

We won’t bombard you with cliché’s and say Blu-ray is the “future” by any means, market conditions change; DivX, WMV HD DVD, HD DVD, EVD, EVD HD, etc are all prime examples of that. Instead, we’ll give you a few solid reasons to invest in the technology.

  1. Harmony: Despite the format war having ended long ago, combo players are still common in many production lines. Although they’re mostly PC drives, with a little work you could probably set up an Extender in your entertainment room with your combo drive at the center of it all. If that’s not your thing why not look around for a standalone combo player, you just mind find what you’re looking for. If you’re really stubborn why not wait until the Xbox 360 Blu-ray drive is released, it was rumored so many time’s it bound to happen eventually…right?
  2. Easy Transition: Blu-ray and HD DVD share many similar qualities, ranging from the cases to the codec’s. With Blu-ray you can still enjoy the bitrates and extra’s you’ve been enjoying on your HD DVD’s, and at times, then some!
  3. Decreasing Price Points: Format war veterans are familiar with this argument, the cheap price point! Blu-ray no longer costs an arm, leg, baby, etc, in fact prices on many introductory players are stooping below $200, just don’t expect the bells and whistles that came with your HD-A2 at that price, or your A1 for that matter.
  4. A Cut Above: Despite HD VMD having its advantages, it might take a while for NME to fully release the format. With the last WMV HD DVD and HD DVD title released just months ago, there’s not much left for those looking into the physical HD market, unless your thinking of importing a CBHD player, Blu-ray is the only format on the market that is able to fully satisfy.
  5. The Lesser of Two Evils: HD DVD Veterans have a few things in common; a hatred for Blu-ray and Digital Downloads might come up often. If physical media is your thing, why not buy a Blu-ray player to extend the physical age and show the analysts and executives that the world still wants more physical media!

And there you have it, any ex HD DVD owners still on the fence about Blu-ray? Agree or disagree with this article? Feel free to post all criticisms, additions, etc below!

Related posts:

  1. 10 Reasons Why Physical Media Owns!
  2. Pioneer Lowers BD Drive Price and More!
  3. Digital Downloads to Overtake Physical Media by 2017?
  4. CBHD Leads Marketshare over Blu-ray in China
  5. CBHD Players Ship In China, Format War Begins

Comments

25 Responses to “5 Reasons Why HD DVD Owners Should Go Blu”

  1. Ironman195 on January 5th, 2009 5:30 am

    I have over 200 HD DVDs and really love that format. I have the Xbox 360 HD add on, an HD-A1 and now the BH200. I was able to justify it to myself since it would also play HD DVDs. It’s a good player and I’m glad I bought one. I just wish that the disc prices themselves would come down. The BD Java just isn’t as slick, robust or consistent as my favorite format, but I guess it doesn’t really matter to most people. However, if physical media is to survive, it must lower its prices. Just my humble opinion….

  2. webdev511 on January 5th, 2009 7:30 am

    I went Purple long before Warner killed HD DVD, but I’m not buying nearly as many titles on Blu as I did on HD DVD before titles went on clearance.

    Other than expense and (correct me if I’m wrong on this on) no manditory Dolby Digital Plus 1.5mbps (which I bet Warner would use if it were there) support I don’t have any real issues with Blu as a format. I do have many gripes with how the studios are using it.

    1. Menus still pale in comparison to HD DVD
    2. Visible DNR, Edge Enhancement and over compression
    3. Far too many releases on BD25 (might as well have kept 30 GB HD DVD around if they weren’t going to use Blu’s superior capacity)
    4. Where the heck are the catalog releases?

  3. wewa on January 5th, 2009 8:01 am

    Interesting topic title on this post, but the 5 points turned out to be weak and not compelling for the HD DVD orphan.

    I am purple but my BD units have been barely used. They just don’t have the same SD upconversion, and efficient navigation. I am also disappointed how much I paid for them, and what they can and cannot do.

    My Toshiba’s can do more for much less. And even my XDE500 for $99 blows all my BD units to shame.

    Even my $39 Phillips 5992 is more fun to use. Region free, hackable firmware, easy remote, good upconversion, Divx support, and USB port that I have a 250GB portable HDD connected so I can watch divx, wmv, mpeg and jpeg on my PDP HDTV. A great substitute as a poor man’s HTPC.

    And the BD disc prices, with often poor quality transfers from the studios, god, don’t get me started.

    Anyway, your points were very weak. Do you even own a HD player?!

    1. Harmony? Why do I need to be charity for the BDA? Make a compelling, mature product, at reasonable prices and mainstream adoption will come naturally.
    2. Easy transition? By what definition? If all BD hardware can read and play HD discs, that’s what you call a seamless transition. Or if BDA offers a free exchange of your HD discs for their BD equivalent, that may be a low tech solution as well. But as it stands, its about as easy a transition as moving from PC to Mac, or from Palm to Blackberry, or Standard to Metric. About the only easy transition I see is that the HDMI cable fits the back of the BD units.
    3. Decreasing price? Well, when you have an average player price of $499, then $299 sounds good. But when everyone says “you can get them as low as $199 now,” that is not fully revealing. That would be a Insignia brand unit or other low tier maker. A lot of people are not interested in ‘Brand X’ units, including myself. BD is overall still a poor value at this time.
    4. I don’t even understand this point?! Are you trying to say VMD is a cut above? So that would be a minus point for BD, on top of NOT being a BD adoption reason in this article. 5-1-1= 3 Reasons To Go Blu is the new title for this post.
    5. Two evils? Another reason I don’t fully comprehend.

    Sorry to shoot down all your points but try and come up with another version of this.

    Who wrote this? A 12 year old boy with a PS3?

  4. Andrew on January 5th, 2009 10:09 am

    Originally Posted By webdev511
    3. Far too many releases on BD25 (might as well have kept 30 GB HD DVD around if they weren’t going to use Blu’s superior capacity)
    4.

    Unlike HDDVD, BluRay is capable of handling the next generation of HDTVs with twice the resolution of current TVs, thats what the 50 gig disc is for, but not only that, there will also be, 100, 250, 500, 750, and 1terabyte discs in the future, they already have the technology that is bluray ready, all it takes is a small firmware update to cuurent BluRay players to use them

  5. Ryan on January 5th, 2009 10:30 am

    Originally Posted By Andrew
    Unlike HDDVD, BluRay is capable of handling the next generation of HDTVs with twice the resolution of current TVs, thats what the 50 gig disc is for, but not only that, there will also be, 100, 250, 500, 750, and 1terabyte discs in the future, they already have the technology that is bluray ready, all it takes is a small firmware update to cuurent BluRay players to use them

    What resolution are you talking about, exactly? 1080p is the current resolution – are you saying BD is capable of supporting the new 4K resolutions being talked about; because it doesn’t. The 50GB Disc is a little overrated, but was a large part of BD’s superiority campaign – most box sets on both formats included the same # of discs (see: Planet Earth). The disc size just stores information, it doesn’t allow further development of the technology – that would require a new technology.

  6. Ryan on January 5th, 2009 10:31 am

    Oh, I wanted to gloat: I actually found an HD-A2 on the shelf @ Wal Mart last night … Seriously. It caught me off guard for real.

  7. Mehar Gill on January 5th, 2009 10:52 am

    @wewa

    If you’re a HD enthusiast and don’t already own a Blu Ray player it’s probably because of the following:

    1. Your waiting for cheaper prices for various reasons
    2. You’re doing it in spite

    All these reasons are completely valid for those who haven’t taken the plunge.

    1. If you’re on the fence but have the ability to buy something that will play not only your VCD and DVD collection but your HD DVD’s as well, wouldn’t that be another valid reason for you to pick up a Blu Ray player? Hell, in Japan the VHS/Blu Ray combo players do well enough to warrant more, people like “harmony”.
    2. Would you prefer going from HD DVD to let’s say the XBLVM or Vudu? How about VHS to DVD, I wonder how many people had trouble navigating the menu system and dealing with things such as subtitles, commentary, etc compared to VHS where all you do is pop in your tape and play, at the most you fiddle with the fast forward/rewind buttons. Blu Ray and HD DVD are so similar it would require very little learning to switch between the two.
    3. Your just nitpicking now, Suzuki is a horrible car company yet it still sells despite being on par or just under the price tag of the “next best thing”. $199 is simply an entry point, if you wanted to get into Blu Ray especially considering the economic conditions are you really going to care much about the brand when the price tag is what really matters?
    4. When did I say that? I said it has its advantages, just like how HD DVD had its advantages over Blu Ray. The purpose of the argument was to say there’s really no other market alternative available.
    5. Odds are if you supported HD DVD but aren’t on the Blu Ray bandwagon yet it’s out of spite or uncertainty. If everyone including Sony and the BDA are saying Blu Ray is quite possibly the last physical medium because of Digital Distribution, why not get in on it and show companies you want more physical media if you’re not a fan of Digital Distribution?

    You start apologizing yet make attacks right after that, what?!?!?

    @Andrew

    Your going to have to explain you’re argument a bit.

    There’s really been NO confirmation the entire disc is backwards compatible with current players, it’s still “beating around the bush”. Perhaps only the first two layers are backwards compatible with current players which seems plausible.

  8. Andrew on January 5th, 2009 11:29 am

    Originally Posted By Ryan

    Originally Posted By Andrew
    Unlike HDDVD, BluRay is capable of handling the next generation of HDTVs with twice the resolution of current TVs, thats what the 50 gig disc is for, but not only that, there will also be, 100, 250, 500, 750, and 1terabyte discs in the future, they already have the technology that is bluray ready, all it takes is a small firmware update to cuurent BluRay players to use them

    What resolution are you talking about, exactly? 1080p is the current resolution – are you saying BD is capable of supporting the new 4K resolutions being talked about; because it doesn’t. The 50GB Disc is a little overrated, but was a large part of BD’s superiority campaign – most box sets on both formats included the same # of discs (see: Planet Earth). The disc size just stores information, it doesn’t allow further development of the technology – that would require a new technology.

    Im talking about 4k standardization, thats 2160p , HDDVD did not support that

  9. The Guardian on January 5th, 2009 11:57 am

    Actually the Insginia brand player has been as cheap as $99, at least in Canada, and name brands like Samsung, Sony and Sharp have all been under $200. Samsung still is, in fact. I don’t personally like Samsung, but they’re certainly a “name brand”. So yes the prices have come down a lot.

  10. Tyler Pruitt on January 5th, 2009 12:22 pm

    @Andrew

    4K is about 4x the resolution of 1080p.

  11. webdev511 on January 5th, 2009 12:32 pm

    Originally Posted By Andrew
    Im talking about 4k standardization, thats 2160p , HDDVD did not support that

    @Andrew
    You are correct. HD DVD was supposed to be the bridge format from 480p DVD to 2160p or higher on flash. That’s why the DVD forum tried to keep implementation costs down.

    Given the issues that still plague BD50 replication lines, I doubt we’re going to see more layers before flash based distribution takes off. I would be very surprised if more than 50% of existing players could be flashed to access additional layers.

  12. glenn on January 5th, 2009 6:22 pm

    HD DVD owners have to accept they got screwed over, we all did. this was never our choice, it was big bully companies with big wallets that made the choice for us, i think they took the format war a bit to literally. the bu-ray format wasnt even finished when they won the “war”. it’s beta vs vhs all over again, hd hdvd is the new beta – to be laughed at in years to come by the masses and defended as the better format by a handful of people in the know. either way it is obsolete & time to move on.

    there is more to consumer electronics than the products, people sometimes cannot tell the difference between quality products and quality marketing. the war did have one benefit, it sped up the implementation of bd2.0 which could have been released a lot later as the format was unfinished when it went public and without competition could have stayed that way for longer. however that also managed to screw over the blu-ray early adopters, so yeah we all got screwed.

    this article is kinda a no-brainer. if you had a hd-dvd player you bought it when you were unsure of the formats longetivity but wanted the latest HD quality – an early adopter, or got one on clearance???. there is now less risk of getting burned, so all emotions aside, you would(should) already have a blu-ray player unless you have some sort of unhealthy love affair with your hd dvd player. there really is no other choice until hd downloads are as good, then you have a whole new argument on your hands.

  13. Dave Cowl on January 5th, 2009 11:32 pm

    There are many good reasons to buy into Blu-ray if you are an HD media fan.

    Most of them are released by Disney, Sony and Fox/MGM.

  14. The_Omega_Man on January 6th, 2009 12:45 am

    Glenn I agree that everyone got screwed in that format battle. The problem is that people are STILL being screwed. Between the still high media prices (on average) inconsistent and in my opinion still incomplete BD Profile specs. BD-Java (don’t get me started) Poor Internet Interactivity BD-Live (now 2+ years later) Poor start up times on many of the Profile 1.1 BD players, mixed (at best) and variable SD DVD upconversion quatlity, Media playback issues with different titles (STILL)!

    Please!

    It is basically an insult to tell HD DVD owners that they should just abandon that which worked and still works so much better that BD (at this point), and that they should jump on to the proverbial blu-ray train to hell! Just so that they (the vaunted blu-ray fans), can ultimately show the studios some lame attempt at a niche market solidarity and support, just to get them to do what they should have been doing all along for HDM, is pathetic IMO!

    Am I bitter you may ask, Absolutely Not! But I do not like to have ANYTHING , figuratively, shoved down my throat, with self serving statements to the affect of, You have no other choice!…..BS, I know that I always have a choice.

    I and many others now have HD content coming out of our ears. For me it’s more that I can watch and from more places than I can subscribe to. Sure, it may not look the same as a BD version of the movie/TV show, but at this point, it still looks DARNED GOOD as compared to the Analog TV and Analog Cable, of 3 years ago! And I do not need to justify my reasons to stay were I am for now, to anyone (but the wife! =-) )

    Because many BD fans have made the investment into BD they quite naturally tend to feel the need to defend that purchase decision and look for solidarity and security in numbers. They vehemently defend BD against all challengers, not realising that it is those very challenges to BD, that has brought it this far, this fast. And continues the drive ($25 in marketing ) to finish or enhance (BD-Hybrid) the format.

    HD DVD fans are already casualties of War. There is nothing really left to defend there, except the need to not have to settle for one iota less that what they had with HD DVD.

    The real problem is that BD, as a media delivery platform, is too little and too late! The future of HD content delivery is via downloads and movies on memory cards, for portability.

    That is the train that intelligent HD DVD fans should wait on! IMO. BD isn’t going ANYWHERE. And HD movie fans need to wait for and demand a REAL Revolutionary change in the way we get and watch our beloved movies.

    2009 is the year of Change, right? We might as well make it worth it!

  15. bmz on January 6th, 2009 11:56 am

    @glenn
    “there really is no other choice until hd downloads are as good, then you have a whole new argument on your hands”
    So right you are! Vudu’s HDX is as good as BR without all the crap associated with BR. BR can, and should, be skipped.

  16. Rich Morgan on January 6th, 2009 12:36 pm

    Five Reason HD DVD owners SHOULDN’T go Blu:

    1. Why would you want to buy into yet ANOTHER good-as -dead already format ?
    ( Even after Christmas giveaways, Blu with STILL less than 10% market share !?

    2. Blu is dead.

    3. Blu is dead.

    4. Blu is dead.

    5. Last, but not least. If all the above reasons are not enough to dissuade you, try this one : Blu is a Sony venture. ‘Nuff said !

  17. Ryan on January 8th, 2009 8:21 pm

    I thoroughly believe there is no reason everyone with an HDTV that enjoys movies should own a BD player – unless they own a quality DVD player (but my Philips is 1080p!) – because the players are cheap by almost everyone’s standards. Rent the movies @ Netflix or Blockbuster (or your local rental store) and you’ve not invested much cash at all, but can enjoy high quality transfers on a bunch of titles (notice I didn’t say on every disc!).

    Honestly though, I believe everyone should get a quality DVD player in the first place (and hook it up correctly!), BD has just made it easier to achieve that without spending a ridiculous amount of cash.

  18. Ryan on January 9th, 2009 4:02 pm

    Ooh, just to clarify that comment – I meant there is no reason you should be without one, not no reason you should have one. Sorry!

  19. ron on January 10th, 2009 11:54 am

    There is only one reason why hd dvd owners should go blu, too see new releases in HD.

  20. Mehar Gill on January 10th, 2009 11:56 am

    @ron

    Not exactly, I can see new HD releases on XBLVM, Vudu, Apple TV, etc

  21. ron on January 10th, 2009 1:13 pm

    I guess I should have said hard copy.

    Can you even get lossless audio from the others.@Mehar Gill -

  22. David on February 3rd, 2009 12:02 am

    Apple TV is a joke!!!!!!!!!!!!! Everyone who is not on the blue bandwagon yet…….don’t worry…..YOU WILL BE!!!!!!!!!! Enjoy your 720 hd from Apple

  23. Belard on February 3rd, 2009 10:28 pm

    Exactly what HD releases are those that are in 1080p with hidef audio and without the digital artifacts?

    BD50 isn’t large enough to handle a 2hr 4K movie… at least 100GB of storage space is needed.

    Also if 4K is coming to the consumer market, I doubt it’ll be anytime soon. At best, maybe 5 years… but most likly 10~15 years. The industry would want to milk the consumer as much as possible. But considering how many people are buying 50~70″ wide screen TVs, 1080 isn’t sharp enough. Back when HDTV was being developed to replace SD, the standard TV that most people bought were 25″. When HD first hit the market, 27~32″ 4:3 were most popular.

    2K had better NOT be considered for broad consumer use. Its only a bit better than today’s 1080p (1920×1080). Currently 4k is used in movie theaters to play movies being played off of hard drives. The theaters want to use BD100+ for transport of movies.

  24. Peter on February 25th, 2009 2:34 pm

    I said this last year and I am still sticking to it, until Bluray can offer me what HD DVD could I won’t bother. This means a multi region player and full profile 2 implementation at a sensible price. Until then I will happily stick with DVD for new releases. Tbh I’m still not sure Bluray will be anything but this gen’s Laserdisc.

  25. Blue_on_Blue on May 7th, 2009 12:33 pm

    I have both HD DVD and Blu Ray players and discs. I have had some playback issues with Blu Ray discs and no playback issues with HD DVD.

    Anyone mentioning that HD DVD owners are being spiteful is an inaccurate representation of the facts and the truth.

    Right now, you can get HD DVD titles for dirt cheap! The argument made on the 5 reasons why we should go Blu doesn’t hold much bearing.

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