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Confirmed: Circuit City’s HD DVD Players On Clearance

Posted by Tyler Pruitt on January 27, 2008 
Filed Under: Deals, Format War, HD DVD, Retailers



0127081701wtmk.jpg We had heard Circuit City was clearancing their stock of HD DVD players, so we went to check for ourselves. We did indeed find all of the third gen HD DVD players on clearance. With the HD-A3 for $100 and the HD-A30 for $149, which are killer prices that even beat Amazon’s. We do wonder if this this is the beginning of the end of HD DVD players for sale at B&M stores.

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Comments

45 Responses to “Confirmed: Circuit City’s HD DVD Players On Clearance”

  1. Merrick97 on January 27th, 2008 8:23 pm

    One can only hope…

  2. webdev511 on January 27th, 2008 9:20 pm

    Toshiba is discontinuing the SKUs that have 300 (WB) + Bourne in them.

  3. MI on January 27th, 2008 9:43 pm

    Um, I think it’s at least ‘the middle of the end’ if not later…

  4. Sporty on January 27th, 2008 10:39 pm

    @webdev511

    Where you hear that? I’ve seen and heard several confirmations that HD-DVD players are being phased out of CCs but only read on HD-DVD forums about the 300 deal. As far as I know it’s coming from HD-DVD fans that are paranoid trying to spin it around.

    Considering that pack ins like 300 would have been the same SKU and Toshiba would have bought X amount for the promotion that doesn’t seem like a logical explanation.

  5. Jesterrace on January 28th, 2008 1:13 am

    You know I do find it really interesting to note that these days formatwarcentral is definitely slanting it’s articles towards Blu-Ray. Don’t get me wrong I’m not saying that things definitely aren’t going in Blu-Ray’s favor at the moment but I notice that they conveniently left out some things such as deals going on at Amazon.com (prices down in the $120s range for the A3 now) and the Best Buy deals with an additional 2 handpicked titles (which BTW you can pricematch them to amazon.com.

    I guess I can forgive the above but when they fail to post the following article, I have to seriously question the reliability of the information on stats and numbers posted on this site. In this article NPD officially debunks the stats that we have been seeing these last couple of weeks which are showing Blu-Ray leading by a landslide. It really surprised me that it wasn’t in the news forum.

    http://www.dailygame.net/news/archives/007137.php

  6. The Guardian on January 28th, 2008 3:20 am

    They don’t need to change the SKU to change what movie is bundled.. minor changes like that are fine with the same SKU.

    Look at the Superman Returns on Blu-ray, there are the new ones with lossless audio tracks but they have the same SKU as the old ones…

  7. Jonsson on January 28th, 2008 4:56 am

    Another nail in the HD-DVD coffin I hope…

  8. BarBol on January 28th, 2008 6:03 am

    Blu-Ray is next victim as streaming video becomes King.

  9. DavidB on January 28th, 2008 6:09 am

    Great time to pick up a player, even if you ARE Blu this is a great price!

    One can only hope with all hardware vendors perhaps soon able to focus on Blu-ray, and Sony’s new smaller/cheaper Blu-ray laser, such prices as these for a high def player will soon be the norm rather than the special.

  10. C on January 28th, 2008 7:05 am

    Prices seem to be normal online.

  11. Dave Cowl on January 28th, 2008 8:31 am

    @DavidB: I believe that HD DVD players and BD players are very similar in cost to make, and that it is mostly a marketing strategy that has kept the prices of HD DVD players lower than BD players.

    For that reason I agree that the new blue lasers, etc. will allow BD player pricing to fall significantly over time, especially with the BD drives in the PS3 allowing volume cost downs.

    The main difference between HD DVD and BD is that the BD manufacturers want to actually make a few $$$ on the hardware. Toshiba’s strategy has effectively made them the only supplier – these latest moves appear to have even pushed Venturer out of the market.

  12. Kevin Murphy on January 28th, 2008 8:58 am

    Dave–

    Blu-ray players require tighter tolerances, better mechanicals, and more precise electronics than HD DVD. That’s how they get the higher densities and bandwidth. This costs more money.

    HD DVD uses as much off-the-shelf as they can (e.g. Celerons running Linux), which are cheaper than the Sony-developed custom hardware chips.

    The whole point of the format war was a belief that Sony’s strategy was too costly, and that their technology was overkill for the job. Turns out they won anyway, but that does not mean that the critics didn’t have a point.

    There’s a service manual for the A2 running around the internet, and if you look at it you’d see just how little there really is inside. Everything but the actual decoding is done in a low-end Celeron, which is why it takes so long for a Toshiba to boot up.

  13. Ryan on January 28th, 2008 10:31 am

    The cost thing mostly has to do with Studio & Distributors ability to more cheaply convert DVD manufacturing lines to HD DVD lines, versus turning them into BD lines. That’s the only cost advantage – I don’t know where people are trying to reference discs cost less etc unless based on that argument …

  14. Jonsson on January 28th, 2008 10:58 am

    Basically the whole “cost advantage” is based on HD-DVD trying to reuse OLD technology. Of course this is tempting but it’s…well…cheap (as well as shortsighted).

    When going for a new standard one should look at creating something for the future. The costs for BD, both hardware and material, will hopefully go down quickly now when the majority of the industry now seems to support a single format.

  15. Dave Cowl on January 28th, 2008 12:46 pm

    Kevin: The chips in the Blu-ray players are not made by Sony – they are made by Sigma Designs and Broadcom. With the most recent Panasonic player, they have their own chip.

    The main cost advantage in the HD DVD player is simpler optics. That is the only cost advantage. With Sony and partners developing smaller and cheaper optical systems as noted in recent news, this cost advantage will not amount to much moving forward. The volumes of PS3 drives using the same components will help prices come down significantly.

  16. Mi on January 28th, 2008 12:57 pm

    Wells aid, Johnson. I would add that the future proofing that BD offers over HDVD is invaluable. Imagine if the DVD folks had decided that they could just use compression and existing CD media to bring DVD to market? When CD was new we though ti was HUGE, after a few years we realized that 700 meg wasn’t a whole lot. so we got DVD 4 gig and dual layer 8 gig, thinking that was unbelievable storage! Now I carry more than that around on my key chain. So getting a ‘next generation’ format that has a little more than 3x the space of a DVD is almost pointless. 50 gig is much better starting point. The 40 meg of bandwidth compared to 28 is good headroom as well.

  17. Dave Cowl on January 28th, 2008 3:39 pm

    @Jesterrace: The article you link and the dozens of similar articles do not debunk the statistics – they just say that one week is not a trend. I agree that one week is not a trend, but no matter how you care to spin the information, the sales ratios in hardware for the second week in January were 90:7:3 for Blu-ray, HD DVD and Combos respectively. NPD has confirmed that this is the case.

    You notice that articles like the one you linked neglect to post the actual numbers, just some hand waving and excuses for why the were so incredibly skewed. They don’t want the actual facts, the numbers sold, getting in the way of the spin that they are trying to place on the week. If you want to be worried about integrity, I think you should be worried about sites that try to say that 7% of the market share for the second week of January ‘actually isn’t so bad all things considered’, especially the ones that purposefully neglect to post that fact…

  18. Stanley Simon on January 28th, 2008 6:32 pm

    Toshiba’s president Atsutoshi Nishida is either living
    in a fantasy world with Peter Pan or has no clue
    as to which High Def the consumer is buying.

    The president of Toshiba – Atsutoshi Nishida
    should be sacked for his hand in HD DVD failures.

  19. webdev511 on January 28th, 2008 7:02 pm

    @Dave Cowl

    week ending 1/5 it was BR 15,257 : HD 14,558
    week ending 1/12 it was 21,770 : 1,758

    NPD is saying the incease in BD sales (6000+) is due to bundling with TV’s.

    Toshiba says the drop for HD DVD players was…

    Toshiba’s comment

    “During the week that is being singled out, both Blu-ray disc players and software were being given away for free with the purchase of 1080p TVs. It is also important to note that the instant rebate promotions that had previously netted Toshiba’s players’ MSRP’s to $199 and $249 had actually ended on Jan. 5th – causing an increase in HD DVD’s MSRP back to $299 and $399 during that same week.”

    So between Warner & a price INCREASE, you get a big sales drop off. The cut put in place the following week will get some of that back, but HOW much remains to be seen.

  20. The Guardian on January 28th, 2008 7:31 pm

    In other words, if there was no price difference at all, they would sell under 2000 HD DVD players per week. I don’t see how that is positive for them? And they can hardly complain about a promotion giving away free BD players when they are now practically giving away A3′s (and have with A2′s in the past).

  21. Jesterrace on January 28th, 2008 10:10 pm

    Just goes to confirm what I had suspected. This site is definitely slanted towards BD. I won’t waste any more time reading the stuff here as it is as accurate as http://www.blu-ray.com or the digital bits. As for the use of old technology that is a bunch of crap. The A3 with the latest V1.3 firmware will cut the load times to 30-35 seconds per boot-up. The only Blu-Ray player that can do it significantly faster is the PS3 which runs no less than $400. There is the whole 1080p argument but that is a bunch of marketing BS unless you have a 55″+ set/projector that supports HDMI V1.3. Also as has been pointed out by Toshiba any TV with decent de-interlacing capabilities that supports 1080p will auto-convert a 1080i signal up to 1080p. The bottom line is that for the average consumer the only advantage at present is that BD is currently supported by more studios. There are two ways of looking at this though. You can say that the majority of studio support is behind Blu-Ray and drop $400 on a player that is fully upgradable and well prepared for the future (the PS3 is really the only machine that is really setup for that). Or you can look at it this way: Currently there is no support for your $400 Blu-Ray player from two of the major hollywood studios and as it sits right now you can still get Warner titles in HD-DVD all on a player that up-converts regular DVDs better than the Blu-Ray players (confirmed by many who have both formats), comes with 7-9 free HD movies and costs $100-$150. Keep in mind that the DVD format is still the dominant format by far. A feature that in and of itself that is worth $70. I got in on the 9 free promotion at Best Buy last week AND pricematched them to Amazon.com. So I walked out the door with the A3 and 4 titles (300 and The Bourne Identity in the box) and 2 titles that were handpicked by me and now I have 5 more coming in the mail. All for $135.67 with tax included. So as mentioned above even if the format tanks how can you possibly go wrong. Furthermore if the format tanks I am going to be able to pick up a bunch of titles for clearance prices which will be better than even the bogo sales which Blu-Ray had. I will still be able to enjoy the dominant format for years to come on this player and still have a decent selection of high-def content all at an affordable price while I wait to see if Blu-Ray is going to either declare itself the champ and keep it’s price-tag high or if it is going to have to jump through a bunch of hoops to try and take on the DVD format. Truth be told I don’t think either format will take over DVD by the time the next big thing comes out.

    Anyways, for you folks wanting an end to the high-def war and for Blu-Ray to win you need to seriously consider the following:

    1. There is already evidence that prices will remain high for a while. Just take a look at the BDP-1400 from Samsung and the S300 from Sony. Both players could be had for as low as $270 during the Christmas season, which were the cheapest Blu-Ray players on the market. They are currently listed for $328 and $363. You cannot find any Blu-Ray standalones for any cheaper (unless you are talking used or refurb units) .

    2. All of the Bogo sales that you have been enjoying on Blu-Ray titles will disappear and you will be stuck paying a premium for BD titles.

    3. The format will be stuck between a rock and a hardplace if it decides to go up against DVD it is going to have to drastically cut it’s prices in order to gain mass market appeal. Or it can keep it’s current stance and be doomed to a niche market.

    Just some things to consider.

    Reply | http://www.blu-ray.com or the digital bits. As for the use of old technology that is a bunch of crap. The A3 with the latest V1.3 firmware will cut the load times to 30-35 seconds per boot-up. The only Blu-Ray player that can do it significantly faster is the PS3 which runs no less than $400. There is the whole 1080p argument but that is a bunch of marketing BS unless you have a 55\"+ set\/projector that supports HDMI V1.3. Also as has been pointed out by Toshiba any TV with decent de-interlacing capabilities that supports 1080p will auto-convert a 1080i signal up to 1080p. The bottom line is that for the average consumer the only advantage at present is that BD is currently supported by more studios. There are two ways of looking at this though. You can say that the majority of studio support is behind Blu-Ray and drop $400 on a player that is fully upgradable and well prepared for the future (the PS3 is really the only machine that is really setup for that). Or you can look at it this way: Currently there is no support for your $400 Blu-Ray player from two of the major hollywood studios and as it sits right now you can still get Warner titles in HD-DVD all on a player that up-converts regular DVDs better than the Blu-Ray players (confirmed by many who have both formats), comes with 7-9 free HD movies and costs $100-$150. Keep in mind that the DVD format is still the dominant format by far. A feature that in and of itself that is worth $70. I got in on the 9 free promotion at Best Buy last week AND pricematched them to Amazon.com. So I walked out the door with the A3 and 4 titles (300 and The Bourne Identity in the box) and 2 titles that were handpicked by me and now I have 5 more coming in the mail. All for $135.67 with tax included. So as mentioned above even if the format tanks how can you possibly go wrong. Furthermore if the format tanks I am going to be able to pick up a bunch of titles for clearance prices which will be better than even the bogo sales which Blu-Ray had. I will still be able to enjoy the dominant format for years to come on this player and still have a decent selection of high-def content all at an affordable price while I wait to see if Blu-Ray is going to either declare itself the champ and keep it\’s price-tag high or if it is going to have to jump through a bunch of hoops to try and take on the DVD format. Truth be told I don\’t think either format will take over DVD by the time the next big thing comes out. \r\n\r\nAnyways, for you folks wanting an end to the high-def war and for Blu-Ray to win you need to seriously consider the following:\r\n\r\n1. There is already evidence that prices will remain high for a while. Just take a look at the BDP-1400 from Samsung and the S300 from Sony. Both players could be had for as low as $270 during the Christmas season, which were the cheapest Blu-Ray players on the market. They are currently listed for $328 and $363. You cannot find any Blu-Ray standalones for any cheaper (unless you are talking used or refurb units) . \r\n\r\n2. All of the Bogo sales that you have been enjoying on Blu-Ray titles will disappear and you will be stuck paying a premium for BD titles. \r\n\r\n3. The format will be stuck between a rock and a hardplace if it decides to go up against DVD it is going to have to drastically cut it\’s prices in order to gain mass market appeal. Or it can keep it\’s current stance and be doomed to a niche market. \r\n\r\nJust some things to consider.’); return false;”>Quote
  22. Jonsson on January 28th, 2008 11:04 pm

    Jesterrace, personally I find this site reporting facts as they are, nothing more, nothing less. As for the “bunch of crap” well I see some of that in your email. HD-DVD deliberately wanted to re-use existing machinery for production of DVD’s etc and thus the had to limit themselves as to capacities of their format. Quite frankly I think I see quite a load of “crap” in your post.

    Less than 400$ for a new technology hardware is not very expensive. Sure if you want the cheapest of the cheapest go for HD-DVD, but with that attitude you’re perhaps better of with an even cheaper upscaling DVD-player. Quality doesn’t really matter in that case, does it?

    BD prices are going to come down even further. If you can be bothered to lock at the history of any technology intensive product, prices have always started high and then been dropping rather quickly as the product matures.

    Do not expect to get a BD for the price of a DVD though. Providing a better quality product for the same price as a lesser one at the same time as the lesser one still is on sale is just poor marketing strategy.

    I believe that the prices of both DVD and BD will go down but there will always be a gap. So the ones that wants the cheapest of the cheapest can till get just that :-)

  23. Jonsson on January 28th, 2008 11:05 pm

    Whoops, sorry I ment to write “post” not “email” in my above post.

  24. webdev511 on January 29th, 2008 8:21 am

    @Jonsson

    If the end user can’t see the difference between 1080p/24, de-interlaced 1080i/60 and 480p they are not going to pay for the more expensive of the three.

    What that really means is that BD and HD DVD have to look better than upconverted DVD on a 40″ display at wal-mart or target. The problem is that a lot of people can’t tell the difference between the picture of HD media and DVD at Magnolia. The audio gets their attention, but the casual shopper probably wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between a 7.1 lossless and 5.1 lossy setup unless someone points it out to them.

    End result? Both HD Media formats will be niche until the hardware cost is negligible and the disc prices are within $5 of standard DVD.

    Oh, and TL51 is a reality. It actually works on ALL generations of HD DVD players better than the orignal TL45 spec did, so the capacity argument is BUNK. I highly doubt that studios will use all three layers for HD, more likely they will continue to use two layers (34GB) for HD and the third layer for SD, which makes a twin format disc with a full HD & Standard Def move a reality. Plays at home in HD, plays in the mini-van in SD.

    That said, our (HD Enthusiasts) opinions don’t matter much. Both HD formats are irrelevant if the end user can’t see what they’re paying more for. You call it cheap, they call it value.

  25. Jonsson on January 29th, 2008 11:35 am

    @webdev511

    Well, I personally believe (but that’s of course just my opinion) that there enough users out there that either can see the difference or just want the better product (just like some people by a much more expnsive car than what they atually need) such that HD hardware and content will not be a niche product.

    Actually given the growth figures and general interrest, I think it’s passed that point already.

    I think quite a few people will be able to see the difference between HD audio and SD audio. As for 5.1 or 7.1 audio I am more doubtful. I would probably not be able to tell that much difference if I was submitted to a “blind” test I’m sure of that. And setting up a 7.1 system requires you to have a suitable space as well which is a porhibiting factor for accptance. I would not be able to set one up in my current viewing room because I simply wouldn’t be able to fix the speakers at their proper positions for instance.

    I agree that what the bulk of the users choose is what matters in the end but from any figures that I have seen, so far they have choosen Blu-ray.

    If users can truly not see the difference between upscaled DVD and HD material then they should stick with DVD’s to get the most “value” as you name it. But when making a new high quality format I call it cheap to cut corners and create some “half assed” middle way that will have to be replaced again in the not so distant future. I’d rather go with something more expnsive (within reason) that has a longer life expectancy. Again my opinion.

  26. Jonsson on January 29th, 2008 11:41 am

    Great, I shouldn’t write posts at the same time as the kids are sitting in my lap. I of course meant “difference between HD video and SD video” and not audio. Sorry for them spamming with corrections.

  27. Dave Cowl on January 29th, 2008 12:44 pm

    @webdev511: We now see that halving the price of the players has not achieved sales in the same numbers as the pre-Warner announcement sales.

  28. Dave Cowl on January 29th, 2008 12:51 pm

    @Jesterrace: I agree that an HD DVD owner will be able to build quite a decent collection of movies from the 400+ titles that are currently available as they get put in the clearance bins moving forward.

    Of course, if they want to have movies moving into 2009, they will need to invest in something else as well.

    I guess it depends on whether getting things cheap or getting thing you actually want moving forward is more important to you…

    BTW, it seems that we have new NPD numbers that show BD players outselling HD DVD players 2:1, with the new ‘half price’ HD DVD players. It certainly looks to me that there was a change in early January that player price cuts has not been able to reverse, with HD DVD sales still 40% lower than the first week of January.

    Just because information favours Blu-ray disc, it doesn’t make it any less true.

  29. DS2 on January 29th, 2008 2:27 pm

    @Dave

    Whoa, you’re jumping the gun a bit, aren’t you, Dave? Numbers may be favoring Blu for now and maybe moving forward, but unless I missed a major announcement there is still Uni and Par/Dreamworks remaining HD DVD exclusive. That may change, but it hasn’t yet, so to say HD DVD owners have no new movies to look forward to moving into 2009 is a tad presumptuous at this time, isn’t it?

    If we get the word tomorrow that they’re going to start releasing Blu discs, then that’s another story, but until we actually hear/read the words…just saying.

  30. DS2 on January 29th, 2008 3:20 pm

    Well, I checked my local CC stores(Madison, WI), and none of the Toshibas are clearanced. The manager said it was a misprint that should have been corrected. (?)

    I was looking forward to picking up a backup player, too.

    Oh well. *shrugs*

  31. DS2 on January 29th, 2008 3:31 pm

    Yeah. Apparently, it was a pricing error:

    http://forums.highdefdigest.com/showthread.php?t=39256

  32. Jesterrace on January 29th, 2008 3:46 pm

    @Dave to be fair though, there are two things to consider in these figures:

    1. The Warner announcement came on the 4th of January.

    2. The Toshiba price reductions were not introduced until the 14th of January.

    So there is a 10 day period there in which Blu-Ray definitely had a major jump on HD-DVD. That being said when you look at the figures it’s not the absolute landslide figures that we were seeing a week or two ago in which Blu-Ray was supposed to have captured a 93% market share. So there definitely is evidence that the price drops are making a difference for HD-DVD. I will be much more curious to see what the results are like at the end of next month.

  33. Merrick97 on January 29th, 2008 7:07 pm

    Dont forget that NPD numbers DONT include the PS3 and its unlikely that even if Toshiba were giving the players away that they would ever beat those numbers.

  34. Dave Cowl on January 30th, 2008 12:27 am

    @DS2: Let’s discuss that in a year or so ;) My prediction/expectation is that Universal will go Blu in the next few months. I could be wrong, but I would be surprised if they don’t. And Paramount is likely to be doing Blu by year end. With the dismal support for HD DVD in 2008 so far from U and P (most future HD DVDs being announced are from _Warner!_), I can’t see them waiting until they are the only HD DVD majors left to start the transition to the dominant format…

    @Jesterrace: It still seems that the numbers after the 50% price drop were 40% down compared to the first week (pre-Warner) of January. Sadly it seems that we probably won’t get leaked NPDs anymore since the source of them was asked to stop by NPD and has agreed to do so…

    @Merrick indeed a lot of people believe that the PS3 is a key player in the install base. Whether large all small, it is certainly a significant addition to the BD standalone install base when it comes to software sales.

  35. James Segars on January 30th, 2008 7:20 am

    So, is this a pricing error or a nationwide decision?

  36. Belard on January 30th, 2008 9:53 am

    Ah! I knew I kept forgetting something. And if you’re on another forum, bring this up.

    When the players dropped to $130 and then $100 – One of the things I noticed is that some HD owners stating that “I’m buying a back up unit” or “I’m buying one for the bedroom” (more backup than bedroom). This isn’t great, especially for a “cheap backup”… and for multi-player homes, it doesn’t mean more software sales for the studios. Think THEY don’t look at forums?

    I’ve also seen on another site. A thread in which some HD-DVD fanatics are talking about BUYING HD-DVD players to bring the numbers up! OMG! Perhaps a few dozen people across the US have done this – like that would make a difference! Duh, the software sales still don’t go up.

    Kind of like the PS3 factor in BR. Considering there are about 10million PS3s out there and 1 million each for BR / HD Players – then the Software sales of BR should always be about 10x over HD… rather than 70% or so marketshare.

    I used to have 3 Amiga computers (A lot of us had more than 1) – but that isn’t as good as 3 people owning 1 computer each.

  37. DS2 on January 30th, 2008 2:43 pm

    @Dave

    I’m not saying you won’t be proven right eventually. I just meant for right now. ;)

    And what do you mean dismal? MOBSTERS!

    Sorry, I had to. That one boggles me to no end. A catalog like Unis and they put out Mobsters? WTF? Where’s my Conan the Barbarian, dammit?

  38. Dave Cowl on January 30th, 2008 2:56 pm

    I was just looking at the line up for 2008 (including this week). Universal + Paramount/DW make up 16% of the major studio releases announced so far. Sony alone has announced more than twice that. Makes for sobering news.

  39. DS2 on January 30th, 2008 4:36 pm

    The weak release slate is unprecedented. I have hopes that they’re secretly planning a double assault of strong titles. Nothing would benefit HD DVD more right now than to be able to exclusively offer titles like Gladiator, Braveheart, Scarface, Apocalypse Now, The Godfather, and the Star Trek movies. Their greatest strength is right there in those titles(among many others)–they’re dropping the ball to not take advantage of that.

  40. chris on January 31st, 2008 6:41 am

    I work at Circuit City in TV’s… I was just researching to see if it was indeed true. Clearance tags truely mean clearance at CC, we arent getting any more in (although my store hasnt tagged them)… They are pushing blu-ray like you wouldnt believe.

    There is no reason for them to reduce cost this ridiculous on a3/a30 unless it is going out of production (there is no new product replacing it). The only reason a2/20 dropped was for the replacing a3/30. I usually pushed HD-dvd believing it to be more acceptable by the consumer, but apparently BD will have its day.

    Side note, I considered buying one anyway… afterall, 100$ for true 720p content aint bad :) + I get 7 free movies :) even in regular dvds 100$ for 7 is pretty good

  41. Jesterrace on January 31st, 2008 1:41 pm
  42. Joses on January 31st, 2008 6:04 pm

    You know the silliest thing to do is to squander money on a dying format. To hell with price cuts, I’m not going down a dead end. Just imagine one year from now going nowhere looking for technical support for a format that no longer exist… sounds horrible. Better safe the day and buy into blu.

  43. Jonathan on January 31st, 2008 9:13 pm

    I look forward to a new article about how this was wrong.

  44. Jonsson on January 31st, 2008 10:49 pm

    I look forward to a new article confirming what Chris said above.

  45. wysiwyg on February 5th, 2008 6:55 am

    Now that they denied it, where’s all responses to the comments about “it’s true, they are going bluray exclusive! I work there and I can confirm!”? How is this confirmed when a week later, it was “denied”. Makes me wonder about certain claims sometimes.

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